Archive

26 March 2016

Update No. 1

Good news first: the first month was pretty solid. No purchases other than earmuffs and gloves (and right in the nick of time, too, because goodness me did it get cold). There has been replacements - moisturizers (same exact brands as the ones I emptied), knit jumpers (destroyed in the wash, and destroyed the replacements too, so in summary no more jumpers), and G-Tech pens (because all it takes to destroy them is an accidental drop while uncapped). And there was the emergency hand cream purchase because my hands got so dry that they started bleeding.

Oddly enough, it wasn't as difficult as I thought. Mostly it's thanks to the (unholy) trinity of Netflix, winter, and the rediscovery of cross stitching which made me extremely reluctant to leave the comfort of my apartment. But there is also this shift from the shopping mindset of chasing after the best bargains to just getting the best I can afford, discount or no discount. I find that to be extremely effective in preventing subsequent purchase - if I already have, in my possession, what I perceive to be the best, what would be the point in getting a presumably inferior item, no matter how huge the discount?

And then there's the bad. Well, not so much bad as it is a complication.
Two things: work and our engagement shoot. The latter is self-explanatory. The former, well, I've gone from barely one meeting a month, to three meetings a week. Now I own exactly one (1) white button down shirt, so you can see how this new state of things became slightly problematic. I have no qualms wearing the same thing every meeting, but I do insist on them being laundered in between wears, you know?

So for a few weeks now I have been actively trying to shop for new clothes. Trying is the operative word, because nine times out of ten I would come home empty handed. I know, I know, I can't believe it either. As it turns out, I don't like shopping if it's something I have to do. But I would like to think that the fact that once I gave myself "permission" to go ahead and purchase stuff I didn't go bonkers and just started buying things left and right is a sign that maybe, maybe this whole thing could be working after all,

23 March 2016

Chasing Trains: Work Edition

Today I woke up in a hotel room somewhere north south of Tokyo, got lost finding our branch office which was actually in the exact same building (but different entrance, see), had my lunch break in the form of a twenty minute cab ride, and spent three hours in a meeting conducted entirely in Nihongo which, despite my weekly lessons, I am still struggling with (read: wakarimasen).


It's not the most ideal of situations, but now I'm all bundled up under fluffy sheets, my tummy happy after downing an avocado burger (from Freshness Burger, which if you can't tell from the name, is like the best franchise ever), wearing the first hotel robe I seriously considered stealing (I even checked if they have it up for sale), with this view right outside my window.


So I can't complain, really.

I've been doing a fair bit of flitting about for work lately. It's exhausting, to say the least - there are days when I leave the apartment before sunrise to catch the first shinkansen out of Tokyo, and then take the last train back - but part of me is enjoying it. It's no secret I love trains, and to get to ride the shinkansen for free is not going to get old for a good while. I think it comes from the weekly back and forth from my home to Manila since high school - it takes four hours one way, and there was nothing to do inside the bus apart from staring out into the window, and so eventually I somehow just learned to entertain myself that way.


Just between you and me, though, I slightly prefer Germany's ICE, with the huge tables and the restaurant car and the free gummy bears in first class. But on a clear day and if I somehow manage to pick the right window seat, I do get to stare at Mt. Fuji for a good hour.


So I guess what I'm saying is, things have been quite hectic lately, but in a very good way. ^^

16 March 2016

Depachika Diaries: Gramercy New York

I've been trying to avoid the depachika - the sprawling wasteland of wonderful food that is the department store basement - because it's terrible for the waistline, but today is Happy Wednesday (no work after six, yay) and my colleague told me she was going to this place that sells "the fluffiest yummiest cake" and well, who am I to resist.

It's called Gramercy New York, but it's a Japanese company.


But of course.
Like crepes and baumkuchen, it's just one of those things that the Japanese have made their own. And they do it so well, too, so no complaints here.

Now, I'm usually wary of desserts in these parts because they seldom taste as pretty as they look (so very heartbreakingly pretty, so maybe it's not fair), and maybe ninety percent would contain some form of red bean filling, which makes me irrationally angry (case in point: Muji's giant sakura marshmallows - I was so, so very upset). But I'm happy to report that this seems to be an exception.

Even the freaking ice pack comes nicely packaged

I ordered the classic New York cheesecake. It's not much of a looker, but oh my goodness.


Fluffy, creamy, cheesy goodness with just the right hint of citrus, nestled on top of a lovely pecan crust. So totally worth the calories, and the migraine that is brewing right at this very moment.

And the best part?


Less than two thousand yen for the entire cake. Now excuse me while I go into a food coma.

P.S. Remember that scene in Friends where Rachel and Chandler were eating cheescake off the floor? It's probably this one <3

09 March 2016

Cold Weather Favorites

It's officially spring, at least commercially, what with the proliferation of everything sakura-themed from train station decor to seasonal Starbucks lattes. The weather is... well, it has yet to decide; a sunny twenty degrees one day, and then back to bleak below-zero chill the next. Kinda makes you miss the comforting predictability of Singapore weather (hahahaha NO).

This winter was/is relatively mild, as is usually the case in these parts. There was one crazy day of snow, but apart from that it's really just fall, minus the colors and a couple of degrees, and so I never really felt like I had to prepare for it too much. Having said that there are a couple of things I like to have around whenever I venture out of the tropics.

Anti-static Keyring

The one thing I hate about winter - more than wading through several inches of slush while feeling as if my ears and nose are about to fall off - is static. For some reason I'm just very prone to getting shocked (my boss posits that it must be because my clothes are made of "plastic or something"). And not tiny ones, mind you - one time I grabbed the train handrail and the resulting spark was so loud that people actually turned to look. As soon as the temperature dips to single-digit territory, I start getting terrified of touching anything with the tips of my fingers - I can honestly say I would much rather get injections than static shocks.

Thankfully Japan has a product for everything - a kitchen tool for slicing avocados (and avocados only), a container for a single banana (or banana-shaped object), a thingamagig made specifically to keep the lid of your cup ramen closed while it cooks, the list goes on - and that includes something to deal with static shock.


Essentially it's just a keyring that you "touch" things with before using your fingers. It has saved me more times than I could remember, and as stupid as I probably look, tapping a pink keychain on to every single thing I come across before touching it, I am not going to be without it. Supposedly using an actual key will achieve the same thing, but I don't have one (my apartment uses keycards), and this was like less than ten dollars and it also doubles as a flashlight so all in all I'd say it's money well spent.

Muji Humidifier

Muji makes the prettiest things, and their humidifier is no exception. I can always tell if I forgot to turn it on the night before because I wake up with itchy, uncomfortable skin and a very scratchy throat. It also doubles as a night lamp (everything doubles as a light source, it seems), and as a fragrance diffuser - mine came with a bottle of Sweet Orange essential oil which is a wonderful yummy citrus scent.


The Body Shop Mango Sugar Scrub

This is one of my very few sample success stories - I got it in one of those five-tiny-things-for-ten-dollars sort of deals. For months it languished in the bottom of my drawer until that one fateful day when I ran out of body wash. Long story short: I am now on my third giant tub.


It's an oil-based scrub, so if you dislike feeling all "slippery" in the shower (think Dove soap x10), then I wouldn't suggest getting this. But if you can get past that (and the extra bathroom cleaning time), you are rewarded with really intense moisture - it has kept my eczema at bay despite the daily hot showers (horrible for the skin, but what choice do I have at zero degrees so early in the morning?). It also helps that mango is one of my favorite scents from The Body Shop - they just do it so well. I have yet to see any other brand that does it better.

Rain Boots

Wellies are like health insurance, or seatbelts. Most of the time, they're utterly useless, but that one single point in time when they're absolutely necessary is enough to justify their entire existence.

It has snowed only once this winter, but it piled on a couple of inches overnight, and then it all started to melt the next morning. Just as everyone was on their way to workk. Oh joy. Picture tiny puddles of ice water bordered by slush. I've never really thought of rain boots as winter apparel, but I am pretty sure I wouldn't have made it to the office without them (or if I did I would've spent the entire morning in the bathroom thawing my feet and quite possibly crying as well).


I initially planned on getting Hunter boots, because they seem to be the popular choice, but then I found these going for half off on Amazon. They are from this brand called Kamik, and they're made in Canada (these days, finding anything not made in that other country is a cause for celebration). This particular style is called Olivia, and it's a bit narrow on the leg so I don't look like a clown when wearing them (I wear a size 7 in these and the calf circumference is around 14 inches). The material is not as flexible as I would like, but for my daily commute it's enough. For prolonged wear I would probably look for something a bit more comfortable and padded (or get fleece liners, maybe). At any rate, even if I don't get a single additional day of wear out of these in the foreseeable future (which is unlikely, because spring showers), they'd still be worth it, having saved me that one crazy winter morning.

29 February 2016

Wedding Bits and Pieces

If it were all up to me, the wedding will be held at the Gesu, and then we all go down (from the hill ;p) and have lunch at Ken Afford.

It is, however, not all up to me. Not to mention the fact that the Gesu does not conduct weddings, and Ken Afford can't even fit my side of the family. But it's a thought I always go back to whenever I feel caught up in the crazy wedding vortex.

According to every movie ever told, women have been planning their weddings ever since they were eight. Clearly I over-procrastinated, because here I am, two decades (and then some) later, and all I have is bits and pieces - an idea here, a firm resolve there, an a fervent hope that everything would somehow come together in the end.

The Dress

Probably the only thing I've actually been giving a thought since I was a kid. I remember going to my lola's mananahi friend, for reasons I could not remember, and flipping through the stacks of wedding magazines she always has in one corner. Even then I gravitated towards designs that were free of embellishments - no beads, no embroidery, no lace. And unlike my love for neon green, this one stuck.

Saying yes to this dress if the liposuction plans push through (merely starving myself is not enough).
Credits: Rosa Clara

Also, pockets (a girl can dream).

On Entertainment

This falls squarely within the "different strokes for different folks" thing, but I really hate it when the entourage is forced to dance. Yes it looked awesome on that one viral video, but that's because they were all into it. But if they aren't, as is the case 90% of the time, it shows, and it's just so much awkwardness for everyone. I don't find entertainment value in watching people just wanting it to end, you know?

In the same vein I also dislike the whole bouquet tossing shebang, again because in general nobody wants to do it - everyone's trying to hide in the bathroom, and the emcee starts calling out names, and people get pushed onto the stage when all they would like to do, really, is chat and eat; tell me, where is the fun in all of this?

My sister has warned me that my refusal to make a fool out of my guests - and myself - is going to result in crickets (read: the most boring wedding, ever), but there is food, and music, and family and friends to catch up with. Shouldn't that be enough?

On Monobloc Chairs

No.
Just no.
Even before Abe proposed we have already discussed this, and very intensely so. I understand the convenience, from a supplier point of view, but not only are they uncomfortable to sit on, with the ribbon on they also look like blindfolded ghosts.
No.

On DIY

While I like the concept of adding personal touches to the wedding, I am not going the DIY route for two reasons.

First, when I was a kid, whenever some family friend got married, my mother would volunteer to make the souvenirs. This was the era of the utterly useless tchotchkes, and she would get these ceramic doves and cages and tiny little flowers from who knows where (Divisoria, most probably) and make these lace ribbons in the same color as the blindfold on the aforementioned ghost chairs and print out these tiny cards with the bride and groom's name, and it was my task to glue them all together. It was fun, for the first five pieces. When you hit what seems like the hundredth or so (probably closer to the twentieth, but hey, I was a kid), and your fingers are all burnt from the hot glue, and you're all bleary-eyed but you can't stop because the wedding is tomorrow, well, you kinda make a promise to your future self to never ever repeat the same mistake.

And then there is the mild OCD. I remember getting a very thorough scolding after I ripped out my notes because I didn't like the way my notes looked. That was in first grade. X years later (read: this year), I went through three planners, each one filled out for only a week and then promptly discarded because I... didn't like the way my notes looked. I really feel bad about wasting all that paper (and I'm a grown woman, for crying out loud), but I found it impossible to move on without switching to a new notebook. I finally found my peace on the fourth one, and will use the rejects for Japanese character writing practice. But the point is, I am absolutely sure that the same scenario will play out should I go all DIY on my wedding. So for my mental wellbeing, and that of the people who surround me (also, in the interest of less waste), this one I'm leaving to the professionals.

On Priorities

Again, different strokes, different folks.
We chose to splurge on rings and photos, because that's what we get to keep.
We chose to splurge on food, because that's what people remember (at least that's what I remember).
We chose to splurge on the wedding planner, because we want to come out of all of this healthy, sane, and most importantly, alive.

Everything else, it's just fluff.
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26 March 2016

Update No. 1

Good news first: the first month was pretty solid. No purchases other than earmuffs and gloves (and right in the nick of time, too, because goodness me did it get cold). There has been replacements - moisturizers (same exact brands as the ones I emptied), knit jumpers (destroyed in the wash, and destroyed the replacements too, so in summary no more jumpers), and G-Tech pens (because all it takes to destroy them is an accidental drop while uncapped). And there was the emergency hand cream purchase because my hands got so dry that they started bleeding.

Oddly enough, it wasn't as difficult as I thought. Mostly it's thanks to the (unholy) trinity of Netflix, winter, and the rediscovery of cross stitching which made me extremely reluctant to leave the comfort of my apartment. But there is also this shift from the shopping mindset of chasing after the best bargains to just getting the best I can afford, discount or no discount. I find that to be extremely effective in preventing subsequent purchase - if I already have, in my possession, what I perceive to be the best, what would be the point in getting a presumably inferior item, no matter how huge the discount?

And then there's the bad. Well, not so much bad as it is a complication.
Two things: work and our engagement shoot. The latter is self-explanatory. The former, well, I've gone from barely one meeting a month, to three meetings a week. Now I own exactly one (1) white button down shirt, so you can see how this new state of things became slightly problematic. I have no qualms wearing the same thing every meeting, but I do insist on them being laundered in between wears, you know?

So for a few weeks now I have been actively trying to shop for new clothes. Trying is the operative word, because nine times out of ten I would come home empty handed. I know, I know, I can't believe it either. As it turns out, I don't like shopping if it's something I have to do. But I would like to think that the fact that once I gave myself "permission" to go ahead and purchase stuff I didn't go bonkers and just started buying things left and right is a sign that maybe, maybe this whole thing could be working after all,
No comments
23 March 2016

Chasing Trains: Work Edition

Today I woke up in a hotel room somewhere north south of Tokyo, got lost finding our branch office which was actually in the exact same building (but different entrance, see), had my lunch break in the form of a twenty minute cab ride, and spent three hours in a meeting conducted entirely in Nihongo which, despite my weekly lessons, I am still struggling with (read: wakarimasen).


It's not the most ideal of situations, but now I'm all bundled up under fluffy sheets, my tummy happy after downing an avocado burger (from Freshness Burger, which if you can't tell from the name, is like the best franchise ever), wearing the first hotel robe I seriously considered stealing (I even checked if they have it up for sale), with this view right outside my window.


So I can't complain, really.

I've been doing a fair bit of flitting about for work lately. It's exhausting, to say the least - there are days when I leave the apartment before sunrise to catch the first shinkansen out of Tokyo, and then take the last train back - but part of me is enjoying it. It's no secret I love trains, and to get to ride the shinkansen for free is not going to get old for a good while. I think it comes from the weekly back and forth from my home to Manila since high school - it takes four hours one way, and there was nothing to do inside the bus apart from staring out into the window, and so eventually I somehow just learned to entertain myself that way.


Just between you and me, though, I slightly prefer Germany's ICE, with the huge tables and the restaurant car and the free gummy bears in first class. But on a clear day and if I somehow manage to pick the right window seat, I do get to stare at Mt. Fuji for a good hour.


So I guess what I'm saying is, things have been quite hectic lately, but in a very good way. ^^
No comments
16 March 2016

Depachika Diaries: Gramercy New York

I've been trying to avoid the depachika - the sprawling wasteland of wonderful food that is the department store basement - because it's terrible for the waistline, but today is Happy Wednesday (no work after six, yay) and my colleague told me she was going to this place that sells "the fluffiest yummiest cake" and well, who am I to resist.

It's called Gramercy New York, but it's a Japanese company.


But of course.
Like crepes and baumkuchen, it's just one of those things that the Japanese have made their own. And they do it so well, too, so no complaints here.

Now, I'm usually wary of desserts in these parts because they seldom taste as pretty as they look (so very heartbreakingly pretty, so maybe it's not fair), and maybe ninety percent would contain some form of red bean filling, which makes me irrationally angry (case in point: Muji's giant sakura marshmallows - I was so, so very upset). But I'm happy to report that this seems to be an exception.

Even the freaking ice pack comes nicely packaged

I ordered the classic New York cheesecake. It's not much of a looker, but oh my goodness.


Fluffy, creamy, cheesy goodness with just the right hint of citrus, nestled on top of a lovely pecan crust. So totally worth the calories, and the migraine that is brewing right at this very moment.

And the best part?


Less than two thousand yen for the entire cake. Now excuse me while I go into a food coma.

P.S. Remember that scene in Friends where Rachel and Chandler were eating cheescake off the floor? It's probably this one <3
No comments
09 March 2016

Cold Weather Favorites

It's officially spring, at least commercially, what with the proliferation of everything sakura-themed from train station decor to seasonal Starbucks lattes. The weather is... well, it has yet to decide; a sunny twenty degrees one day, and then back to bleak below-zero chill the next. Kinda makes you miss the comforting predictability of Singapore weather (hahahaha NO).

This winter was/is relatively mild, as is usually the case in these parts. There was one crazy day of snow, but apart from that it's really just fall, minus the colors and a couple of degrees, and so I never really felt like I had to prepare for it too much. Having said that there are a couple of things I like to have around whenever I venture out of the tropics.

Anti-static Keyring

The one thing I hate about winter - more than wading through several inches of slush while feeling as if my ears and nose are about to fall off - is static. For some reason I'm just very prone to getting shocked (my boss posits that it must be because my clothes are made of "plastic or something"). And not tiny ones, mind you - one time I grabbed the train handrail and the resulting spark was so loud that people actually turned to look. As soon as the temperature dips to single-digit territory, I start getting terrified of touching anything with the tips of my fingers - I can honestly say I would much rather get injections than static shocks.

Thankfully Japan has a product for everything - a kitchen tool for slicing avocados (and avocados only), a container for a single banana (or banana-shaped object), a thingamagig made specifically to keep the lid of your cup ramen closed while it cooks, the list goes on - and that includes something to deal with static shock.


Essentially it's just a keyring that you "touch" things with before using your fingers. It has saved me more times than I could remember, and as stupid as I probably look, tapping a pink keychain on to every single thing I come across before touching it, I am not going to be without it. Supposedly using an actual key will achieve the same thing, but I don't have one (my apartment uses keycards), and this was like less than ten dollars and it also doubles as a flashlight so all in all I'd say it's money well spent.

Muji Humidifier

Muji makes the prettiest things, and their humidifier is no exception. I can always tell if I forgot to turn it on the night before because I wake up with itchy, uncomfortable skin and a very scratchy throat. It also doubles as a night lamp (everything doubles as a light source, it seems), and as a fragrance diffuser - mine came with a bottle of Sweet Orange essential oil which is a wonderful yummy citrus scent.


The Body Shop Mango Sugar Scrub

This is one of my very few sample success stories - I got it in one of those five-tiny-things-for-ten-dollars sort of deals. For months it languished in the bottom of my drawer until that one fateful day when I ran out of body wash. Long story short: I am now on my third giant tub.


It's an oil-based scrub, so if you dislike feeling all "slippery" in the shower (think Dove soap x10), then I wouldn't suggest getting this. But if you can get past that (and the extra bathroom cleaning time), you are rewarded with really intense moisture - it has kept my eczema at bay despite the daily hot showers (horrible for the skin, but what choice do I have at zero degrees so early in the morning?). It also helps that mango is one of my favorite scents from The Body Shop - they just do it so well. I have yet to see any other brand that does it better.

Rain Boots

Wellies are like health insurance, or seatbelts. Most of the time, they're utterly useless, but that one single point in time when they're absolutely necessary is enough to justify their entire existence.

It has snowed only once this winter, but it piled on a couple of inches overnight, and then it all started to melt the next morning. Just as everyone was on their way to workk. Oh joy. Picture tiny puddles of ice water bordered by slush. I've never really thought of rain boots as winter apparel, but I am pretty sure I wouldn't have made it to the office without them (or if I did I would've spent the entire morning in the bathroom thawing my feet and quite possibly crying as well).


I initially planned on getting Hunter boots, because they seem to be the popular choice, but then I found these going for half off on Amazon. They are from this brand called Kamik, and they're made in Canada (these days, finding anything not made in that other country is a cause for celebration). This particular style is called Olivia, and it's a bit narrow on the leg so I don't look like a clown when wearing them (I wear a size 7 in these and the calf circumference is around 14 inches). The material is not as flexible as I would like, but for my daily commute it's enough. For prolonged wear I would probably look for something a bit more comfortable and padded (or get fleece liners, maybe). At any rate, even if I don't get a single additional day of wear out of these in the foreseeable future (which is unlikely, because spring showers), they'd still be worth it, having saved me that one crazy winter morning.
No comments
29 February 2016

Wedding Bits and Pieces

If it were all up to me, the wedding will be held at the Gesu, and then we all go down (from the hill ;p) and have lunch at Ken Afford.

It is, however, not all up to me. Not to mention the fact that the Gesu does not conduct weddings, and Ken Afford can't even fit my side of the family. But it's a thought I always go back to whenever I feel caught up in the crazy wedding vortex.

According to every movie ever told, women have been planning their weddings ever since they were eight. Clearly I over-procrastinated, because here I am, two decades (and then some) later, and all I have is bits and pieces - an idea here, a firm resolve there, an a fervent hope that everything would somehow come together in the end.

The Dress

Probably the only thing I've actually been giving a thought since I was a kid. I remember going to my lola's mananahi friend, for reasons I could not remember, and flipping through the stacks of wedding magazines she always has in one corner. Even then I gravitated towards designs that were free of embellishments - no beads, no embroidery, no lace. And unlike my love for neon green, this one stuck.

Saying yes to this dress if the liposuction plans push through (merely starving myself is not enough).
Credits: Rosa Clara

Also, pockets (a girl can dream).

On Entertainment

This falls squarely within the "different strokes for different folks" thing, but I really hate it when the entourage is forced to dance. Yes it looked awesome on that one viral video, but that's because they were all into it. But if they aren't, as is the case 90% of the time, it shows, and it's just so much awkwardness for everyone. I don't find entertainment value in watching people just wanting it to end, you know?

In the same vein I also dislike the whole bouquet tossing shebang, again because in general nobody wants to do it - everyone's trying to hide in the bathroom, and the emcee starts calling out names, and people get pushed onto the stage when all they would like to do, really, is chat and eat; tell me, where is the fun in all of this?

My sister has warned me that my refusal to make a fool out of my guests - and myself - is going to result in crickets (read: the most boring wedding, ever), but there is food, and music, and family and friends to catch up with. Shouldn't that be enough?

On Monobloc Chairs

No.
Just no.
Even before Abe proposed we have already discussed this, and very intensely so. I understand the convenience, from a supplier point of view, but not only are they uncomfortable to sit on, with the ribbon on they also look like blindfolded ghosts.
No.

On DIY

While I like the concept of adding personal touches to the wedding, I am not going the DIY route for two reasons.

First, when I was a kid, whenever some family friend got married, my mother would volunteer to make the souvenirs. This was the era of the utterly useless tchotchkes, and she would get these ceramic doves and cages and tiny little flowers from who knows where (Divisoria, most probably) and make these lace ribbons in the same color as the blindfold on the aforementioned ghost chairs and print out these tiny cards with the bride and groom's name, and it was my task to glue them all together. It was fun, for the first five pieces. When you hit what seems like the hundredth or so (probably closer to the twentieth, but hey, I was a kid), and your fingers are all burnt from the hot glue, and you're all bleary-eyed but you can't stop because the wedding is tomorrow, well, you kinda make a promise to your future self to never ever repeat the same mistake.

And then there is the mild OCD. I remember getting a very thorough scolding after I ripped out my notes because I didn't like the way my notes looked. That was in first grade. X years later (read: this year), I went through three planners, each one filled out for only a week and then promptly discarded because I... didn't like the way my notes looked. I really feel bad about wasting all that paper (and I'm a grown woman, for crying out loud), but I found it impossible to move on without switching to a new notebook. I finally found my peace on the fourth one, and will use the rejects for Japanese character writing practice. But the point is, I am absolutely sure that the same scenario will play out should I go all DIY on my wedding. So for my mental wellbeing, and that of the people who surround me (also, in the interest of less waste), this one I'm leaving to the professionals.

On Priorities

Again, different strokes, different folks.
We chose to splurge on rings and photos, because that's what we get to keep.
We chose to splurge on food, because that's what people remember (at least that's what I remember).
We chose to splurge on the wedding planner, because we want to come out of all of this healthy, sane, and most importantly, alive.

Everything else, it's just fluff.
No comments